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Condominium Rights and Responsibilities: Unit Owners, Associations, and Developers, Online Training Format

SKU: 365
$19.00

*Includes Applicable 2016 Legislative Updates

Condominium Right and Responsibilities: Unit Owners, Associations, and DevelopersThe condominium arrangement, rooted in the combination of individual home ownership and joint-ownership of common elements, confers certain rights and privileges to residents, but it also places substantial responsibilities on the developers who build the community, the associations that manage it, and the unit owners who reside in it. Each of these groups has a stake in ensuring that condominium homes retain their value and that the community remains a pleasant place to live. Though all parties will readily agree on these goals, there is likely to be friction among them as they must continuously balance one other’s rights and responsibilities. For this arrangement to succeed, all participants must have extensive knowledge of the statutory requirements and association bylaws, as well as common sense and a commitment to fairness.

This course outlines in detail the rights and responsibilities that unit owners, the association, and the developer have under Florida’s Condominium Act. The full range of condominium activities is covered, including calling for and conducting meetings; holding elections; levying and collecting assessments; keeping financial records; maintaining the property; and enforcing restrictions (Discounts are available for Condominium Boards or Property Management Companies by calling us at 1-800-521-9667).

TARGET AUDIENCE
Condominium unit owners, association officers and members, and developers

TIME TO COMPLETE
120 minutes

PURPOSE
To instruct condominium unit owners, association officers and members, and developers on their rights and responsibilities.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After completing this course, the learner will be able to:

  • explain the basic elements of the condominium arrangement as outlined by Florida law;
  • interpret and adhere to state laws regarding the rights of condominium unit owners;
  • distinguish between the rights and obligations of condominium unit owners;
  • interpret and adhere to state laws regarding the rights and responsibilities of condominium associations;
  • explain the role of the developer in creating a condominium; and
  • interpret and adhere to state laws regarding the rights and responsibilities of condominium developers.



If you're not completely satisfied with the quality of our courses, we will refund your money - guaranteed. Click here for detailsTOPICS COVERED

  1. The Nature of the Condominium Arrangement
  2. The Rights of Condominium Unit Owners
  3. The Obligations of Condominium Unit Owners
  4. The Responsibilities and Duties of Condominium Associations
  5. Condominium Association Powers
  6. The Role of the Developer in Establishing the Condominium
  7. The Responsibilities of the Condominium Developer
  8. The Transition of Control of the Condominium Association from the Developer to Unit Owners



FLORIDA REGULATORY COUNCIL OF COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION MANAGERS
This course (approval number: 9626081) has been approved for 2.00 hours of continuing education credit in the areas of IFM or ELECTIVES (ONLINE) by the Regulatory Council of Community Association Managers of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. For more information about continuing education for Community Association Managers, visit the Council's homepage at www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/pro/cam/index.html


Condominium Rights and Responsibilities: Unit Owners, Associations, and Developers

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Instructions
    • THE HUMAN EQUATION, INC. - TERMS OF USE
      • Page 1, 2
  • Course Objectives
  • Chapter 2: Introduction
    • Page 3
    • Balancing Individual Rights with Community Interests
      • Page 4, 5
  • Chapter 3: Unit Owner Rights
    • Page 6
    • Joint Ownership and Use of the Common Elements
      • Page 7, 8, 9, 10
    • Unit Owner’s Right to Sue
      • Page 11, 12
    • Appurtenances
      • Page 13
    • “Permanent” Rights
      • Page 14, 15
    • Unit Owner Voting Rights
      • Page 16, 17, 18, 19
    • Unit Owner Voting Rights
      • Page 20
    • Unit Owner Voting Rights
      • Page 21
    • Unit Owner Voting Rights: Casting Votes
      • Page 22
    • Unit Owner Voting Rights: Internet-Based Online Voting
      • Page 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
    • Unit Owner Voting Rights: Proxies
      • Page 29
    • Voting Rights and Proxies
      • Page 30, 31
    • Notice of Meetings
      • Page 32
    • Notice of Meetings
      • Page 33
    • Unit Owners’ Rights at Meetings
      • Page 34
    • Board Meetings with Attorneys
      • Page 35
    • Unit Owners’ Right of Access to Association Records
      • Page 36, 37
    • Information Not Accessible to Unit Owners
      • Page 38, 39
    • Unit Owners’ Access to Financial Reports
      • Page 40, 41
    • Unit Owners’ Access to Financial Reports
      • Page 42
    • Unit Owners’ Right of Access to Financial Information
      • Page 43
    • Financial Reporting Guidelines: Compiled Statements
      • Page 44
    • Financial Reporting Guidelines: Reviewed Statements
      • Page 45
    • Financial Reporting Guidelines: Audited Statements
      • Page 46
    • Financial Reporting Guidelines: Small Condominium Associations
      • Page 47, 48
    • Unit Owners’ Right to Waive Financial Reporting Requirements
      • Page 49
    • The Role of the Developer in the Preparation of Financial Reports
      • Page 50
    • Unit Owners’ Right to Fair and Equal Treatment
      • Page 51, 52, 53, 54, 55
  • Chapter 4: Unit Owner Responsibilities
    • Page 56
    • Balancing Rights and Obligations
      • Page 57
    • Legal Obligation to Pay Assessments
      • Page 58
    • Obligation to Pay for Limited Common Elements
      • Page 59
    • Liability of Unit Owners
      • Page 60
    • Liability of Unit Owners
      • Page 61
    • Maintenance Responsibilities
      • Page 62
    • Alterations of the Common Elements
      • Page 63
    • Participation in Community Affairs
      • Page 64, 65
  • Chapter 5: The Condominium Association's Responsibilities and Rights
    • Page 66
    • The Condominium Association as Corporation
      • Page 67
    • Declaration of Condominium vs. the Condominium Act
      • Page 68
    • The Fiduciary Duty of the Association
      • Page 69
    • The Association’s Powers and Duties
      • Page 70
    • Association Powers
      • Page 71
    • Condominium Association Contracts
      • Page 72, 73
    • Condominium Association Contracts for Services
      • Page 74, 75
    • Condominium Association Contracts
      • Page 76, 77
    • Hiring a Property Manager
      • Page 78
    • Hiring a Property Manager – Community Association Managers
      • Page 79
    • Community Association Managers
      • Page 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86
    • Hiring a Property Manager
      • Page 87, 88
    • The Association’s Powers and Duties
      • Page 89
    • The Association’s Right to Demand Rent
      • Page 90, 91, 92, 93, 94
    • The Association’s Right to Convey Property
      • Page 95, 96
    • The Association’s Right to Lease or Purchase Property
      • Page 97
    • The Association’s Right to Purchase Property – Foreclosure
      • Page 98
    • The Association’s Right to Lease or Purchase Property
      • Page 99
    • Easements
      • Page 100
    • Restrictions on Changing or Modifying Easements
      • Page 101
    • An Association’s Right of Access
      • Page 102, 103, 104
    • An Association’s Right to Lease Abandoned Units
      • Page 105, 106
    • Insurance
      • Page 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116
    • Borrowing and Spending Money
      • Page 117
    • The Condominium Association’s “Elastic” Clause
      • Page 118
    • Responding to Unit Owners’ Inquiries
      • Page 119, 120
    • Responding to Requests for Assessment Records
      • Page 121
    • Reporting Votes on Retrofitting for Sprinkler Systems
      • Page 122
    • Retrofitting for Sprinkler Systems
      • Page 123, 124
    • Termination of the Condominium Association
      • Page 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133
  • Chapter 6: The Role of the Developer
    • Page 134
    • The Role of the Developer
      • Page 135
    • Who Is Not a Developer?
      • Page 136
    • Creating the Condominium
      • Page 137
    • The Developer's Responsibilities
      • Page 138
    • Disclosures by a Developer
      • Page 139
    • The Developer’s Due Diligence
      • Page 140, 141
    • Organization of the Developer-Controlled Board
      • Page 142
    • The Developer-Controlled Board
      • Page 143
    • Finances
      • Page 144
    • Reporting Requirements
      • Page 145, 146, 147
    • Unique Privileges of Developer-Controlled Associations
      • Page 148
    • Protections for Developers
      • Page 149
    • Limits on Developers
      • Page 150, 151, 152
    • Transition of Power from Developer to Unit Owners
      • Page 153
    • Beginning the Transition
      • Page 154
    • The Transition Meeting
      • Page 155
    • Transfer of Property to the Association
      • Page 156
    • What Developers Must Turn Over
      • Page 157
    • Transfer of Financial Records to the Association
      • Page 158
    • Transfer of Tangible Property to the Association
      • Page 159
    • Transfer of Records to the Association
      • Page 160, 161
    • Outgoing Board and Committee Members
      • Page 162, 163
    • Developer Liability
      • Page 164
    • Contracts Entered Into by the Developer
      • Page 165
    • Cancelling Contracts Entered Into by the Developer
      • Page 166
    • Limits on Management Fee Increases
      • Page 167
    • When Contracts Are Cancelled
      • Page 168, 169
    • A Developer’s Responsibility to Provide Warranties
      • Page 170
    • Statutory Warranties
      • Page 171
    • Contractor/Supplier Warranties
      • Page 172
    • Developer Warranties
      • Page 173
    • Distressed Condominium Relief Act
      • Page 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181
  • Chapter 7: Conclusion
    • Page 182
  • Chapter 8: Time to Review
    • Page 183

Student Benefits

Students and employees who take the Condominium Rights and Responsibilities: Unit Owners, Associations, and Developers course will enjoy:

 Course FeaturesIncludedComments
 
HRCI Recertification Credits
 
0.00 HRCI Recertification Credit(s).
 
SHRM PDC Credits
 
0.00 SHRM PDC Credit(s).
 
CAM Credits
 
2.00 CAM Credit(s).
 
Florida Bar CLE Recertification Credits
 
0.00 Florida Bar CLE Recertification Credit(s).
 
Florida Bar CLE Ethics Recertification Credits
 
0.00 Florida Bar CLE Ethics Recertification Credit(s).
 
State Bar of Georgia CLE Recertification Credits
 
0.00 State Bar of Georgia CLE Recertification Credit(s).
 
State Bar of Georgia CLE Ethics Recertification credits
 
0.00 State Bar of Georgia CLE Ethics Recertification credit(s).
 
FL CE 2-20 Credits
 
0.00 FL CE 2-20 Credit(s).
 
Unlimited 1 Year Access
 
The Human Equation's courses may be accessed and reviewed as many times as you wish even after completion.
 
90 Days Money Back Guarantee
 
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Friendly and Knowledgeable Customer Service
 
M-F from 8:00am to 4:30pm.
 
Table of Contents
 
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Pictures/Illustrations
 
68 pictures/illustrations.
 
Interactive Learning Activities
 
27 interactive learning activities.
 
Audio Narration
 
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Supporting Documents
 
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Case laws
 
9 case laws.
 
Definitions
 
9 definitions.
 
Questions and Answers
 
34 questions and answers.
 
Video Clips
 
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Practice Quiz
 
0 practice true or false questions and 0 practice multiple choice questions.
 
Scored Exam
 
0 exam true or false questions and 0 exam multiple choice questions.
 
Printable Certificate
 
The certificate contains your name, completion date, and the certification organization's ID which you will need to claim your credit(s).
 
Customizable Settings
 
Adjustable font sizes and sounds.
 
Automatic Bookmarking
 
Simply close the course when you are done and it will reopen on the last visited page on your next session.
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Training Manager Benefits

Managers and supervisors who purchase The Human Equation's courses to train their employees will enjoy:

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Convenient User Creation and Management
 
Hierarchy-tree based management
 
Reporting
 
Downloadable spreadsheets.
 
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Automated Email Reminders
 
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Single or multiple user course assignments.
 
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