Categories

Condominium Operations: A Primer for Board Members, Online Training Format

SKU: 188
$25.00

*Includes Applicable 2016 Legislative Updates

Condominium Operations: A Primer for Board MembersCondominium association officials wield substantial power that can significantly enhance or detract from the quality of life of the communities they serve. That power must be exercised judiciously and in a manner consistent with the regulations set forth in Florida's Condominium Act. In fact, the State of Florida holds association officials to the same standard as officers of a corporation, requiring that officers' fiduciary relationship to unit owners form the basis of all their official actions.

By requiring association officials to certify their knowledge of statutory requirements and association bylaws, the State makes clear that ignorance of the rules is neither an excuse for mismanagement nor a legal defense to criminal charges stemming from their official actions.

Informed by the knowledge conveyed in this course, condominium association officials can execute their official duties skillfully and confidently.

TARGET AUDIENCE
Condominium association directors and officers

TIME TO COMPLETE
120 minutes

PURPOSE
To instruct condominium association directors and officers in discharging their fiduciary duties to members of their condominium associations, in keeping with State of Florida's statutory requirements for condominium association management education.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After completing this course, the learner will be able to:

  • explain the basic elements of the condominium arrangement as outlined by Florida law;
  • perform the duties of a condominium association board member in a manner consistent with Florida's Condominium Act and the association's bylaws;
  • conduct elections to the board in a manner consistent with Florida's Condominium Act and the association's bylaws;
  • implement an internet-based online voting system;
  • conduct board, unit owner, committee, and budget meetings in a manner consistent with Florida's Condominium Act and the association's bylaws;
  • maintain condominium association records and provide unit owners access to those records in a manner consistent with Florida's Condominium Act and the association's bylaws; and
  • execute duties relating to obtaining bids for and entering into contracts on behalf of the condominium association in a manner consistent with Florida's Condominium Act and the association's bylaws.



TOPICS COVERED

  1. The Nature of Condominium Ownership
  2. The Association’s Powers and Duties
  3. Conducting Condominium Elections
  4. Conducting Board Meetings
  5. Conducting Unit Owner, Budget, and Committee Meetings
  6. Maintaining Condominium Association Records
  7. Bidding and Contracting




Condominium Operations: A Primer for Board Members

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Instructions
    • THE HUMAN EQUATION, INC. - TERMS OF USE
      • Page 1, 2
  • Course Objectives
  • Chapter 2: Introduction
    • Page 3
    • Balancing Individual Rights with Community Interests
      • Page 4, 5
  • Chapter 3: The Operation of the Condominium
    • Page 6
    • The Condominium Association as a Corporation
      • Page 7
    • The Fiduciary Duty of the Association
      • Page 8
    • The Association’s Powers and Duties
      • Page 9
    • Association Powers
      • Page 10
    • Declaration of Condominium vs. the Condominium Act
      • Page 11, 12
    • The Association’s Powers and Duties
      • Page 13
    • The Association’s Right to Demand Rent
      • Page 14, 15, 16, 17, 18
    • The Association’s Right to Convey Property
      • Page 19
    • The Association’s Right to Lease or Purchase Property
      • Page 20
    • Easements
      • Page 21
    • Restrictions on Changing or Modifying Easements
      • Page 22
    • An Association’s Right of Access
      • Page 23, 24, 25
    • An Association’s Right to Lease Abandoned Units
      • Page 26, 27
    • Borrowing and Spending Money
      • Page 28
    • Responding to Unit Owners’ Inquiries
      • Page 29, 30
    • Termination of Condominium
      • Page 31, 32, 33, 34
  • Chapter 4: Conducting Elections
    • Eligibility and Ineligibility for Election to the Board
      • Page 35
    • Eligibility for Service on the Board
      • Page 36, 37
    • Beginning the Transition
      • Page 38
    • Before the Election
      • Page 39
    • Conducting the Election at a Unit Owner Meeting
      • Page 40
    • First Notice of the Election
      • Page 41
    • Second Notice of Election
      • Page 42
    • Posting Notice of the Election Meeting on the Condominium Property
      • Page 43
    • Notification Requirements
      • Page 44, 45
    • Preparing the Ballots
      • Page 46
    • Appearance of Election Ballots
      • Page 47
    • Ballots Distributed to Unit Owners before the Meeting
      • Page 48, 49, 50, 51, 52
    • Returning the Completed Ballot
      • Page 53, 54
    • Voting at the Meeting
      • Page 55
    • Verifying Signatures
      • Page 56
    • Gathering the Completed Ballots
      • Page 57
    • Opening the Ballot Envelopes
      • Page 58
    • Internet-Based Online Voting
      • Page 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65
    • Tabulating the Votes and Determining the Winners
      • Page 66
    • Who Tabulates the Votes?
      • Page 67
    • Newly Elected Board Member Obligations
      • Page 68, 69
    • Outgoing Board and Committee Members
      • Page 70
    • The Role of the Condominium Ombudsman
      • Page 71, 72
    • When Are Elections Not Required?
      • Page 73, 74
    • Staggered Terms
      • Page 75
    • More Board Vacancies than Candidates
      • Page 76
    • Vacancies between Regular Elections
      • Page 77
    • Runoff Elections
      • Page 78, 79, 80
    • The Use of Proxies at Meetings and Board Elections
      • Page 81, 82, 83, 84, 85
  • Chapter 5: Conducting Board Meetings
    • How Frequently Must Board Meetings Be Held?
      • Page 86
    • When to Hold Board Meetings
      • Page 87
    • Providing Notice of Meetings to Board Members
      • Page 88, 89
    • Providing Notice of Board Meetings to Unit Owners
      • Page 90
    • Providing Notice for Meetings
      • Page 91, 92
    • Providing Notice of Meetings: Consideration of Special Assessment
      • Page 93, 94, 95
    • Board Meetings: Who May Attend?
      • Page 96
    • Meetings with an Attorney
      • Page 97, 98
    • What Role May Unit Owners Play at Board Meetings?
      • Page 99
    • Can Meetings Be Recorded?
      • Page 100
    • What about Meetings Conducted over the Phone?
      • Page 101, 102
    • Professionalism
      • Page 103
    • Where Should Board Meetings be Held?
      • Page 104
    • Come Prepared
      • Page 105
    • Start on Time
      • Page 106
    • Following the Agenda
      • Page 107, 108
    • Board Member Decorum
      • Page 109
    • Beginning the Meeting
      • Page 110
    • Reports
      • Page 111
    • Taking Action
      • Page 112
    • Format for Resolutions
      • Page 113
    • Resolution to Adopt Online Voting System
      • Page 114
    • Unit Owners’ Right to Speak
      • Page 115, 116
    • Open Forum for Unit Owners
      • Page 117
    • Unfinished and New Business
      • Page 118
    • Adjourning the Meeting
      • Page 119, 120, 121
  • Chapter 6: Unit Owner, Budget, and Committee Meetings
    • Page 122
    • Special Meetings
      • Page 123
    • Notification Requirements
      • Page 124, 125
    • Annual Meetings that Include Elections: First Notice
      • Page 126
    • Annual Meetings that Include Elections: Second Notice
      • Page 127, 128
    • Conducting a Unit Owner Meeting
      • Page 129
    • Unit Owner Participation
      • Page 130
    • Proxies
      • Page 131, 132
    • Information on a Proxy
      • Page 133, 134
    • Holding Meetings
      • Page 135
    • General Discussion
      • Page 136
    • Adjourning a Meeting
      • Page 137
    • Meeting Minutes
      • Page 138, 139, 140, 141
    • Committee Meetings
      • Page 142
    • Executive Committees
      • Page 143
    • Eligibility for Service on an Executive Committee
      • Page 144
    • Responsibility for a Committee’s Actions
      • Page 145
    • What Committees Cannot Do
      • Page 146
    • Requirements for Committee Meetings
      • Page 147, 148
    • Requirements for Committee Meetings: Advisory Committees
      • Page 149, 150
    • Budget Meetings
      • Page 151
    • Failure to Contribute to Association Funds
      • Page 152, 153, 154, 155
    • Notice Requirements for Budget Meetings
      • Page 156, 157
    • Notices on the Property for Budget Meetings
      • Page 158
    • Special Budget Meetings
      • Page 159
    • Special Budget Meetings
      • Page 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165
  • Chapter 7: Maintaining Records
    • Official Records
      • Page 166, 167, 168, 169
    • Accounting Records
      • Page 170
    • Providing Access to Accounting Records
      • Page 171, 172
    • Keeping Proper Accounting Records
      • Page 173
    • Providing Access to Accounting Records
      • Page 174, 175, 176, 177
    • Information Not Accessible to Unit Owners
      • Page 178
    • Unit Owners’ Access to Financial Reports
      • Page 179, 180
    • Unit Owners’ Access to Financial Reports
      • Page 181
    • Unit Owners’ Right of Access to Financial Information
      • Page 182
    • Financial Reporting Guidelines: Compiled Statements
      • Page 183
    • Financial Reporting Guidelines: Reviewed Statements
      • Page 184
    • Financial Reporting Guidelines: Audited Statements
      • Page 185
    • Financial Reporting Guidelines: Small Condominium Associations
      • Page 186, 187
  • Chapter 8: Bidding and Contracting
    • Page 188
    • Corporate Structure of Associations
      • Page 189
    • The Importance of Bidding and Contracting
      • Page 190
    • Entering into Contracts
      • Page 191
    • Condominium Association Contracts for Services
      • Page 192
    • Requirements for Contracts for Services
      • Page 193, 194
    • Enforcing Contracts
      • Page 195
    • Cancelling Contracts for Services
      • Page 196
    • Possible Conflicts of Interest
      • Page 197, 198
    • Emergency Powers
      • Page 199
    • State of Emergency
      • Page 200
    • Emergency Powers
      • Page 201
    • Time Limitations on Emergency Powers
      • Page 202, 203
    • Contracting for Maintenance Services
      • Page 204
    • Types of Maintenance Work
      • Page 205
    • Advantages of Outside Property Managers
      • Page 206
    • Community Association Managers
      • Page 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214
    • Hiring Professionals
      • Page 215
    • Legal Issues Handled by Association Attorneys
      • Page 216
    • Association Liens
      • Page 217
    • Associations Foreclosing on Units for Unpaid Assessments
      • Page 218
    • Hiring Accountants
      • Page 219
    • Required Financial Reports
      • Page 220
    • The Need for a Certified Public Accountant (CPA)
      • Page 221
    • Insurance
      • Page 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232
    • Distressed Condominium Relief Act
      • Page 233, 234, 235
  • Chapter 9: Conclusion
    • Page 236
  • Chapter 10: Time to Review
    • Page 237