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Alternative Dispute Resolution:  A Primer for Condominium Association Leaders, Online Training Format

SKU: 547
$19.00

*Includes Applicable 2017 Legislative Updates

Alternative Dispute Resolution:  A Primer for Condominium Association LeadersThe fact is that conflicts are more likely to occur among condominium homeowners, who generally live in close proximity to one another, share ownership of common elements, and are subject to stricter-than-usual limits on their property rights, than those who live in traditional single-family homes. Acknowledging this, the State of Florida requires that all condominium associations have a provision for “mandatory nonbinding arbitration” in their bylaws so that disputes are settled relatively quickly and amicably—without costly, time-consuming litigation that is likely to increase ill will among residents.

This course teaches condominium residents the procedures to follow when using different methods of alternative dispute resolution (ADR), including negotiation, mediation, and arbitration. Statutory guidelines are explained and procedures are outlined for the different methods of ADR. Learners acquire the knowledge needed to achieve satisfactory resolutions to all types of disputes originating from condominium ownership (Discounts are available for Condominium Boards or Property Management Companies by calling us at 1-800-521-9667).

TARGET AUDIENCE
Directors, Officers, Managers, and members of condominium associations

TIME TO COMPLETE
60 minutes

PURPOSE
To instruct Directors, Officers, Managers, and members of condominium associations in the effective use of alternative dispute resolution techniques to settle conflicts among condominium residents in a manner consistent with the regulations enumerated in Florida's Condominium Act and the Florida Administrative Code.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
After completing this course, the learner will be able to:

  • define alternative dispute resolution (ADR);
  • identify the types of ADR;
  • list the advantages and limitations of each type of ADR;
  • pursue different types of ADR, including negotiation, mediation, and arbitration, to resolve conflicts stemming from condominium residence; and
  • apply the rules outlined in Florida’s Condominium Act and the Florida Administrative Code that relate to using ADR to resolve condominium conflicts.



If you're not completely satisfied with the quality of our courses, we will refund your money - guaranteed. Click here for detailsTOPICS COVERED

  1. Legal Guidelines for Initiating Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR)
  2. Determining which Types of Disputes are Subject to ADR
  3. Engaging in Voluntary Mediation at Citizen Dispute Settlement Centers
  4. The Differences between Mediation and Arbitration
  5. Mediation Procedures
  6. Arbitration Procedures



FLORIDA REGULATORY COUNCIL OF COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION MANAGERS
This course (approval number: 9626084) has been approved for 2.0 hours of continuing education credit in the areas of HR or ELECTIVES (ONLINE) by the Regulatory Council of Community Association Managers of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. For more information about continuing education for Community Association Managers, visit the Council's homepage at www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/pro/cam/index.html


Alternative Dispute Resolution: A Primer for Condominium Association Leaders

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1: Instructions
    • THE HUMAN EQUATION, INC. - TERMS OF USE
      • Page 1, 2
  • Course Objectives
  • Chapter 2: Introduction
    • Page 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
  • Chapter 3: Initiating the Process of Alternative Dispute Resolution
    • Page 8
    • Disputes over Board Authority
      • Page 9
    • Disputes over the Board’s Failure to Perform its Duties
      • Page 10
    • Disputes over a Plan of Termination
      • Page 11
    • Disagreements Not Subject to ADR
      • Page 12
    • Methods of Resolving Disputes
      • Page 13, 14
    • Citizen Dispute Settlement Centers
      • Page 15, 16, 17
    • The Next Step: Mandatory Nonbinding Arbitration and Mediation
      • Page 18
    • Mediation v. Arbitration
      • Page 19, 20, 21
    • Mandatory Nonbinding Arbitration
      • Page 22
    • Mandatory Nonbinding Arbitration
      • Page 23
    • Before Petitioning for Arbitration
      • Page 24
    • Petitioning for Arbitration
      • Page 25
    • Acting on a Petition for Nonbinding Arbitration
      • Page 26
    • The Need for Emergency Relief
      • Page 27
    • Requesting Mediation
      • Page 28
    • Scheduling ADR
      • Page 29, 30
  • Chapter 4: Mediation
    • Page 31, 32
    • Failure to Appear at Mediation
      • Page 33
    • Appearing at a Mediation Conference: Individuals
      • Page 34
    • Appearing at a Mediation Conference: The Association
      • Page 35, 36
    • Mediation Procedures
      • Page 37, 38, 39
    • When Mediation Fails
      • Page 40
    • When Mediation Fails
      • Page 41, 42, 43, 44
  • Chapter 5: Arbitration
    • Page 45
    • Notification of Intent to File an Arbitration Petition
      • Page 46
    • Rules Governing Arbitration
      • Page 47
    • Representation at Arbitration Proceedings
      • Page 48
    • Arbitration Proceedings
      • Page 49
    • Arbitration Rules of Discovery
      • Page 50, 51
    • The Rendering of the Arbitrator’s Decision
      • Page 52
    • Arbitration Awards
      • Page 53
    • Enforcing an Arbitration Award
      • Page 54
    • Potential Costs of Filing for a New Trial
      • Page 55
    • Disputes Involving Elections
      • Page 56, 57, 58, 59
  • Chapter 6: Conclusion
    • Page 60, 61
  • Chapter 7: Time to Review
    • Page 62